2022 Range Rover configurator reveals pricing and options

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Land Rover's fifth-generation Range Rover isn't scheduled to reach showrooms until spring 2022, but the British firm is already letting buyers configure the new SUV to their exact specifications. The online configurator has revealed pricing and the list of extra-cost options.

Buyers will have three basic models to choose from: the standard short-wheelbase Range Rover, a more family-oriented long-wheelbase version with seven seats (a first in the nameplate's history), and the extra-posh five-seater long-wheelbase variant. Pricing for these three SUVs is pegged at $105,530, $111,350, and $157,350, respectively, once a mandatory $1,350 destination charge enters the equation.

Each variant is offered in several trim levels. Short-wheelbase buyers can select the base model, the Autobiography ($153,350), or the First Edition ($159,550); the latter will only be available for a limited time. Even the entry-level Range Rover comes generously equipped with 21-inch wheels, LED exterior lighting, a sliding panoramic roof, leather upholstery, heated and 20-way power-adjustable front seats, heated and power-reclining rear seats, a Meridian sound system, and a 13.1-inch touchscreen. We're far from the original truck's rudimentary charm.

Paying nearly $50,000 more for the Autobiography adds 22-inch wheels, black brake calipers, trim-specific exterior emblems, 24-way heated and cooled front seats that can give you a hot stone massage, what Land Rover refers to as Executive Class Comfort rear seats, a head-up display, and a better sound system, among other features. First Edition models benefit from leather cushions in the tailgate and an 11.4-inch rear-seat entertainment system. Once you've chosen a body style, an interior configuration, and a trim, it's time to move on to the engine.

The entry-level Range Rover is powered by a 3.0-liter straight-six twin-turbocharged to 395 horsepower. Selecting the 523-horsepower twin-turbocharged V8 provided by BMW adds a whopping $14,700 to the base price. Non-powertrain-related options include premium metallic paint colors ($1,950), ultra metallic paint colors ($4,550), special effect paint ($9,200), special effect paint with a satin finish ($12,050; notice a pattern?), a heated windshield, 22- and 23-inch wheel designs, and a contrasting black roof. The list of options rivals Porsche's in length.

Buyers who want to haul six passengers on their next road trip will be asked to choose between a base model and the Autobiography trim ($155,350). Little changes on the build sheet, so what you get in a short-wheelbase Autobiography is essentially what you get in a long-wheelbase Autobiography (with the obvious exception of two additional seats in the back). The list of options is largely identical as well.

Finally, the flagship long-wheelbase Range Rover is offered in Autobiography and First Edition ($164,850) trims; there is no base model. Both boast a long list of features that includes 22-inch wheels, a four-zone climate control system, a power outlet that can power devices like smartphones, and a surround-sound system, and they're exclusively available with the twin-turbocharged 4.4-liter V8 engine.

While the new Range Rover is relatively expensive, and options can make it really expensive, it was never exactly cheap. The first-generation model carried a base price of $40,125 in 1990 (the equivalent of about $84,300 in 2021) — which was a lot of money to pay for a truck at the time. The last-generation model started around $100,000 as well. And nothing suggests Land Rover is done expanding the lineup upward. Don't count on seeing a stripped-out, bargain-priced Range Rover anytime soon, but more lavish trim levels are around the corner.

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