4 cities in Philippines have some of the highest costs of living in Asia

·3 min read
Filipino soldiers carry a giant flag of the Philippines before ceremonies to mark the 121st anniversary of Philippine independence at Manila's Rizal Park Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
Filipino soldiers carry a giant flag of the Philippines before ceremonies to mark the 121st anniversary of Philippine independence at Manila's Rizal Park Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Four cities in the Philippines – Makati, Quezon City, Manila, and Cebu – were included in Numbeo’s Mid-2022 Cost of Living Index, a list of the most expensive Asian cities to live in. The cities were at 38th, 43rd, 52nd, 60th place, respectively.

While this was the order of cities in terms of cost of living, rent in general was more expensive in Makati (20th), Manila (30th), Cebu (54th), and Quezon City (63rd), respectively.

Meanwhile, groceries were more expensive in Makati (23rd), Cebu (50th), Quezon City (51st), and Manila (54th), respectively.

In terms of purchasing power, however, Manila takes the lead (91st), followed by Makati (97th), Quezon City (98th), and Cebu (102nd).

Here are Numbeo's findings for the four Philippine cities in its list:

Makati

Aerial view of a Makati district, the Philippines’ financial, commercial and economic hub. (Photo; Getty Images)
Aerial view of a Makati district, the Philippines’ financial, commercial and economic hub. (Photo; Getty Images)
  • Family of four estimated monthly costs are ₱123,082.35 ($2,214.65) without rent (using Numbeo's estimator).

  • A single person estimated monthly costs are ₱35,001.21 ($629.78) without rent.

  • Makati is 44.05% less expensive than Singapore (without rent, see Numbeo's cost of living index).

  • Rent in Makati is, on average, 56.27% lower than in Singapore.

Manila

Aerial view of Rizal Park (Luneta) and the surrounding skyline of the City of Manila. (Photo: Getty Images)
Aerial view of Rizal Park (Luneta) and the surrounding skyline of the City of Manila. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Family of four estimated monthly costs are ₱101,539.23 ($1,827.02) without rent (using Numbeo's estimator).

  • A single person estimated monthly costs are ₱29,089.17 ($523.41) without rent.

  • Manila is 54.74% less expensive than Singapore (without rent, see Numbeo's cost of living index).

  • Rent in Manila is, on average, 69.79% lower than in Singapore.

Cebu City

Aerial view of SM seaside, the largest mall in Cebu City in July 2018. (Photo: Getty Images)
Aerial view of SM seaside, the largest mall in Cebu City in July 2018. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Family of four estimated monthly costs are ₱96,907.80 ($1,743.68) without rent (using Numbeo's estimator).

  • A single person estimated monthly costs are ₱27,513.00 ($495.05) without rent.

  • Cebu is 56.79% less expensive than Singapore (without rent, see Numbeo's cost of living index).

  • Rent in Cebu is, on average, 81.03% lower than in Singapore.

Quezon City

Aerial view of the South Triangle district of Quezon City, Philippines in July 2020. (Photo: Getty Images)
Aerial view of the South Triangle district of Quezon City, Philippines in July 2020. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Family of four estimated monthly costs are ₱108,395.48 ($1,950.38) without rent (using Numbeo's estimator).

  • A single person estimated monthly costs are ₱32,858.18 ($591.22) without rent.

  • Quezon City is 49.80% less expensive than Singapore (without rent, see Numbeo's cost of living index).

  • Rent in Quezon City is, on average, 82.27% lower than in Singapore.

There were 107 entries in the list, with Beirut, Lebanon being on top of the list and Peshawar, Pakistan in last place. All of the indices were made relative to New York City.

According to its website, Numbeo is the world’s largest cost of living database. Numbeo is also a crowd-sourced global database of quality of life data: housing indicators, perceived crime rates, healthcare quality, transport quality, and other statistics.

Mark Ernest Famatigan is a news writer who focuses on Philippine politics. He is an advocate for press freedom and regularly follows developments in the Philippine economy. The views expressed are his own.

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