Alan Peter Cayetano: Knocking out corruption

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Senate Minority Leader Alan Peter Cayetano knew he wanted to be a public servant as early as 13.

Seeing how his father – the late Senator Renato Cayetano – work with people in the district of Taguig, Pateros, and Muntinlupa inspired him to study political science and law.

His experience as a councilor in the University of the Philippines’ student council helped prepare Cayetano to choose a career in public service. He then went on to be a councilor in Taguig at 22.

But Cayetano’s early achievements eventually earned him detractors, who derail his proclamation as vice mayor in Taguig until only 10 days before his three-term in office was due to end.

His short tenure as Taguig vice mayor in 1998 then convinced Cayetano to run for Congress, where he served for two terms.

A minority member, Cayetano was among the prominent congressmen who exposed various scams, standing up against First Gentleman Mike Arroyo during the Arroyo government from 2001.

His advocacy against corruption helped him to win a seat in the Senate in 2007.

It was under his chairmanship that the Senate Blue Ribbon Committee looked into the anomalous deals on NBN-ZTE, Fertilizer Funds, and cash giving in Malcanang against President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo.

He also chaired the Senate Committee on Education, Arts and Culture, which helped pass the University of the Philippines Charter Act of 2008.

As chairman of the Senate Committee on Public Information and Mass Media, he managed to pass the Freedom of Information bill in the Senate during the 14th Congress.

Continuing his commitment on transparency and accountability, Cayetano managed to file at least 14 bills like proposals to amend questionable provisions on the Anti-Cybercrime Act among others.

When the youngest minority leader in the history of Senate is not thinking about politics, Cayetano takes time to fill his room with collectibles of his favourite basketball players -  Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant.

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