Bill creating isolated prison facility for heinous crimes lapsed into law

·Contributor
·2 min read
A security guard checks his phone as he watches over inmates inside Quezon City Jail in Manila, Philippines October 19, 2016. A prison facility specifically for offenders convicted of heinous crimes will be established after a bill creating it lapsed into law. (Photo: REUTERS/Damir Sagol)
A security guard checks his phone as he watches over inmates inside Quezon City Jail in Manila, Philippines October 19, 2016. A prison facility specifically for offenders convicted of heinous crimes will be established after a bill creating it lapsed into law. (Photo: REUTERS/Damir Sagol)

A bill establishing an isolated prison facility for offenders convicted of heinous crimes has lapsed into law, according to a data released by Malacañang on Wednesday (Aug. 3).

The reconciled Senate Bill No. 1055 and House Bill No. 10355, or the Separate Facility for Heinous Crimes Act, mandates the government to build and maintain “a secure, clean, and adequately equipped and sanitary” national penitentiary for those who have been convicted of heinous crimes, or sentenced to life imprisonment.

The law defined heinous crimes as “grievous, odious and hateful offenses and which by reason of their inherent or manifest wickedness, viciousness, atrocity, and perversity or repugnant and outrageous to the common standards and norms of decency and morality in a just, civilized and orderly society.”

The law requires an establishment of at least one heinous crime prison in Luzon, Visayas, and in Mindanao. Prisoners convicted of heinous crimes currently being held at a Bureau of Corrections facility would be transferred here.

“The Heinous Crime Facility shall be located in a secured and isolated place ensuring that there is no unwarranted contact or communication with those outside of the penal facilities,” the law said.

The budget that would be used to fund this will be taken from the Department of Justice’s budget for the first year, and for the succeeding years, a specific allocation would be dedicated here from the national budget.

The law is among the 41 bills from the previous Congress that lapsed into law, after Former President Rodrigo Duterte and incumbent President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. failed to take action on these bills.

Among the 41 bills are Anti-Online Sexual Abuse or Exploitation of Children and Anti-Child Sexual Abuse or Exploitation Materials Act, or Republic Act No. 11930.

Press Secretary Trixie Cruz-Angeles denied claims that President Marcos had gone veto-spreeing, saying that the newly-elected president only vetoed five bills, among them the bill creating the Bulacan Airport City Special Economic Zone.

Marvin Joseph Ang is a news and creative writer who follows developments on politics, democracy, and popular culture. He advocates for a free press and national democracy. Follow him on Twitter at @marvs30ang for latest news and updates.

Watch more videos on Yahoo:

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting