Breivik renounces inheritance so it won't go to state

Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik has renounced an inheritance from his mother to avoid it going to the state which wants to compensate his victims' families, his lawyer said Tuesday.

"It's surely one of the reasons behind his decision," lawyer Tor Jordet told AFP, confirming a report in tabloid Verdens Gang (VG) about his renouncing his inheritance to avoid it falling into state coffers.

The government would have claimed the money to pay damages awarded to the families of his 77 victims by the Oslo court that sentenced Breivik to 21 years in jail in August last year.

During his trial, it emerged that Breivik, 34, had cheated to avoid paying income taxes to a state that he vehemently opposed.

Breivik's mother died in March. The amount of the inheritance was not known, but her apartment was put up for sale on Tuesday for around 3.7 million kroner (484,000 euros, $642,000).

Jordet said the right-wing extremist had renounced his share of the inheritance before his mother's death. It is expected to go to Breivik's half-sister and to charity.

Breivik killed 69 people, mostly teenagers, in a gun rampage at a Labour party youth camp on July 22, 2011, after setting off a massive bomb outside the main government building in Oslo, killing eight.

He had laid out his Islamophobic and anti-multicultural ideology in a rambling 1,500-page online manifesto posted online shortly before the attacks.

Breivik planned the carnage while living with his mother in the apartment in an affluent Oslo neighbourhood.

He had moved back in with his mother in 2006, at the age of 27.

He left in 2011 just a few months before the massacre, moving to a farm where he was able to obtain the fertiliser needed to build his bomb.

Editor’s note:Yahoo Philippines encourages responsible comments that add dimension to the discussion. No bashing or hate speech, please. You can express your opinion without slamming others or making derogatory remarks.

  • Ayungin dilemma Ramon Casiple - Parallaxis
    Ayungin dilemma

    China faces a dilemma in Ayungin Shoal and other contested areas. If it waits for the ITLOS—which may decide against it—it would have tacitly bound itself to UNCLOS and risk a rogue state reputation if it asserts its claim in the South China Sea. If its militarily acts now, it may face international isolation. …

  • 48 nabbed in biggest anti-trafficking catch in Bongao VERA Files - The Inbox
    48 nabbed in biggest anti-trafficking catch in Bongao

    By Jake Soriano, VERA Files Bongao, Tawi-tawi—A team of Marines and policemen intercepted around noon Thursday 48 people, 12 of them minors, believed recruited by a human trafficking syndicate for work in Malaysia. The arrest constitutes what advocates called the … Continue reading → …

  • Docs vow to pay right taxes, make peace with BIR VERA Files - The Inbox
    Docs vow to pay right taxes, make peace with BIR

    By Kiersnerr Gerwin Tacadena, VERA Files Leaders of the medical profession have made peace with their former adversary, the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR), and joined forces in a campaign to get doctors to pay the right taxes. BIR Commissioner … Continue reading → …

POLL
Loading...
Poll Choice Options