Canadian meteorologist reflects on testing positive for the BRACA2 gene mutation

·Lifestyle Editor
·3 min read
Canadian Meteorologist Nicole Karkic opened up about testing positive for the BRCA2 gene mutation. (Photo via @nicolekarkic on Instagram)
Canadian Meteorologist Nicole Karkic opened up about testing positive for the BRACA2 gene mutation. (Photo via @nicolekarkic on Instagram)

Nicole Karkic is getting real about her recent health scare.

Last week, The Weather Network meteorologist took to Instagram to share a photo reflecting on testing positive for the BRACA2 gene mutation, which puts her at an increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer.

"In the fall I tested positive for a gene mutation, in one of the tumour suppressor genes, BRACA2. ... Since then, my genetic counsellor set up appointments with different doctors to talk about next steps," she captioned the post.

Although Karkic has been told she doesn't have cancer, her medical team has been diligent about preventing further complications.

"In the next few months, I will get surgery to remove my ovaries and tubes to help address the risk for ovarian cancer, because it is a very hard cancer to screen for," she explained in her post. "I also will continue to get tested regularly for breast cancer, and talk about the option to undergo a mastectomy."

Fans and friends thanked Karkic for her honest post, praising her bravery and transparency.

"Brave of you to share. I’m glad you can get the medical support you need. Still doesn’t make it easy, I can see," someone commented.

"This post took courage and you proved you can handle anything that comes your way. Stellar friend, mom and colleague. We’re lucky to be inspired by you. All the health and happiness. Whatever ahead, you got it!," said another.

"Take good care and thank you for your transparency. Really helps others going through the same thing," wrote a fan.

Those who carry the BRCA2 gene mutation should regularly get tested for breast cancer. (Photo via Getty Images)
Those who carry the BRCA2 gene mutation should regularly get tested for breast cancer. (Photo via Getty Images)

When asked about why she shared her story on social media, Karkic said it was about "support" and "information."

"I didn't know much about this gene mutation before so I thought others might be the same. I wanted to share with others for support and to get more information in general," Karkic told Yahoo Canada. "Once I posted it, people began to open up and tell their stories and sent me more information, which felt really special and important."

The television presenter also shared her advice for people going through the same situation or are curious to learn more about the gene.

"I am certainly not an expert on this topic, but my advice would be talk to your doctor about the gene in general or if you qualify for any genetic tests to screen for cancers or other conditions that run in your family," she noted. "Of course it's scary and I'm not happy about the situation, but there's an opportunity to learn more and follow through with preventative action that I hope everyone has access to."

"Keep being positive and get all the knowledge you can," she added.

Let us know what you think by commenting below and tweeting @YahooStyleCA! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram and sign up for our newsletter.