Mum shares how to clean pillowcases so they don't cause skin breakouts

Lauren Clark
·2 min read
Pillowcases can harbour bacteria if not washed regularly enough. (Getty Images)
Pillowcases can harbour bacteria if not washed regularly enough. (Getty Images)

If you regularly wash your pillowcases, but are still suffering from skin breakouts, there could be a simple reason.

One mother has revealed that cleaning bedding with fabric softener may be the unlikely trigger for unexpected spots popping up on your face.

In a video on TikTok, social media user @mama_mila_ explained that the household product "can leave a residue" that sabotages clear complexions.

Instead, the popular 'cleanfluencer' suggested to viewers that they stick to a gentle detergent, as well as two to three drops of eucalyptus oil to "get rid of any dust mites or allergens".

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Mila added that white vinegar works as an effective alternative to fabric softener when also added to the washing compartment.

She recommended washing pillowcases every few days, since they harbour sweat and oils – which can also lead to breakouts.

The short clip – viewed more than 13,000 times – has received over 700 'likes', with many thankful for the handy advice.

She isn't the only one to support the idea that regular pillow-washing is an easy way to stave off spots.

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Fitness star Kayla Itsines told fans, in an Instagram post about her skincare routine, that she changes her pillowcase every three days.

Additionally, a dermatologist previously told HuffPost that unwashed pillowcases could be undoing all the hard work invested in night time cleansing regimes. 

Dr David E. Banks explained that – regardless of whether your pillowcase is made from cotton, silk or satin – if it's not changed frequently, there will be "a build-up of dirt and oil from the environment as well as your skin and hair touching the pillow".

This is transferred back onto the face which can, he notes, "clog pores and cause blemishes".