Commission on Human Rights welcomes new top cop’s reform program

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Protesters hold placards seeking justice for 17-year-old high school student Kian delos Santos, who was killed in a recent police raid in an escalation of President Rodrigo Duterte's war on drugs, during a protest in front of the Philippine National Police (PNP) headquarters in Quezon city, Metro Manila, Philippines August 23, 2017. The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) has welcomed tThe new PNP chief's pledge to hold to account erring police officials. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco
Protesters hold placards seeking justice for 17-year-old high school student Kian delos Santos, who was killed in a recent police raid in an escalation of President Rodrigo Duterte's war on drugs, during a protest in front of the Philippine National Police (PNP) headquarters in Quezon city, Metro Manila, Philippines August 23, 2017. The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) has welcomed tThe new PNP chief's pledge to hold to account erring police officials. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco

The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) has lauded the newly-installed chief of the Philippine National Police’s (PNP) pronouncement that it plans to reform the police ranks, and called on him to collaborate with them and faith-based leaders to help nurture a “more compassionate police force.”

In a statement released on Wednesday (August 10), CHR’s Executive Director, Atty. Jacqueline Ann de Guia, also said that the rights commission welcomes the plans of PNP Chief Gen. Rodolfo Azurin Jr. to hold accountable rogue law enforcers for their actions through the Kapulisan, Simbahan, at Pamayanan (Kasimbayanan) program.

“CHR looks forward to its translation to human rights-based policing where due process consistently prevails and violence is significantly reduced, if not totally eliminated,” de Guia said.

“It is also heartening that he intends to tackle the root causes of the drug problem, which will help ensure a long term solution that will truly benefit the communities,” she added.

De Guia also opened the possibility of the two government agencies working together to ensure that the police forces don’t abuse the powers given to them.

“The Commission regularly provides human rights education and training for police officers in partnership with the PNP – Human Rights Affairs Office. We are willing and ready to further work with the PNP in improving the curriculum and training programs,” de Guia said.

“The Commission looks forward to better cooperation and collaboration to resolve cases involving law enforcers,” she said. “This will also help to demonstrate the PNP’s commitment to human rights as part of its obligations and in accordance with its philosophy of ‘Service, Honor, and Justice’.”

Azurin, who was named as the 28th chief of the PNP last week by President Ferdinand Marcos Jr., said that he acknowledged the public’s distrust over the police forces, most especially with its conduct of the Duterte administration’s drug war campaign.

Marvin Joseph Ang is a news and creative writer who follows developments on politics, democracy, and popular culture. He advocates for a free press and national democracy. Follow him on Twitter at @marvs30ang for latest news and updates.

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