DepEd to evaluate performance of ‘pricey,’ ‘outdated’ laptops bought in 2021

·Contributor
·2 min read
Teacher Calvin Errol Alcantara is seen in front of his laptop as he talks to his students at home during the first day of classes in Manila, the Philippines, Sept. 13, 2021. The Department of Education (DepEd) said that they will look into the recently procured laptops flagged by the Commission on Audit if it's too slow for teachers to use. (Photo by Rouelle Umali/Xinhua via Getty Images)
Teacher Calvin Errol Alcantara is seen in front of his laptop as he talks to his students at home during the first day of classes in Manila, the Philippines, Sept. 13, 2021. The Department of Education (DepEd) said that they will look into the recently procured laptops flagged by the Commission on Audit if it's too slow for teachers to use. (Photo by Rouelle Umali/Xinhua via Getty Images)

The Department of Education (DepEd) said that they’re looking into replacing the controversial laptops they recently procured through the Department of Budget and Management’s procurement service (PS-DBM) if it is too slow for teachers to use.

DepEd’s spokesperson, Michael Poa, said in a press briefing on Wednesday (August 10) that they would have to evaluate first if the laptops were indeed slow for teachers’ use, and from there, they will invoke the warranty provisions with the supplier.

Kung talagang mabagal po talaga ‘yung mga computers and not up to par with what we wanted, yan pong mga computers as far as I understand, ay covered pa rin ng warranty,” he said.

(If the laptops are indeed slow and not up to par with what we wanted, that computers, as far as I understand, are still covered by warranty.)

“What we will do, aside from addressing the concerns of the teachers now doon sa mabagal na computers, we will also, in coordination with PS-DBM, … invoke the warranty provision under contract dito sa supplier ng ating laptops (in the supplier of the laptops),” Poa added.

However, Poa said that there is no directive yet to replace the laptops, as they will still have to evaluate first.

“Now, if proven that the laptops delivered do not perform as they should be as purchased, we will then consider available legal remedies,” he said, including the warranty provision.

When the Commission on Audit flagged this in their report, among their recommendations was to “evaluate the concerns raised by the recipients on the conditions, performance, and technical specifications of the laptop and communicate the same to [PS-DBM] for appropriate action.”

“We are trying to remedy the situation with this one kasi malamang, ito ‘yung gagamitin nila for this coming school year,” Poa said.

(We are trying to remedy the situation because these are the laptops they will use this coming school year.)

Marvin Joseph Ang is a news and creative writer who follows developments on politics, democracy, and popular culture. He advocates for a free press and national democracy. Follow him on Twitter at @marvs30ang for latest news and updates.

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