Drivers for Elon Musk's Loop get a script about their 'great leader'

·6 min read

Drivers for Elon Musk's underground Loop system in Las Vegas have been instructed to bypass passengers' questions about how long they have been driving for the company, declare ignorance about crashes, and shut down conversations about Musk himself.

Using public records laws, TechCrunch obtained documents that detail daily operations at the Loop, which opened in June to transport attendees around the Las Vegas Convention Center (LVCC) using modified Tesla vehicles. Among the documents is a "Ride Script" that every new recruit must follow when curious passengers ask questions.

The script shows just how serious The Boring Company (TBC), which built and operates the system, is about controlling the public image of the new system, its technology and especially its founder, Elon Musk.

"Your goal is to provide a safe ride for the passengers, not an entertaining ride. Keep conversation to a minimum so you can focus on the road," advises the document. "Passengers will pepper you with questions. Here are some you may be asked and the recommended responses."

If riders ask a driver how long they have been with the company, they are instructed to respond with: "Long enough to know these tunnels pretty well!" The document goes on to note: "Passengers will not feel safe if they think you've only been driving for a week (even though that could mean hundreds of rides). Accordingly, do not share how long you've been employed here, but instead, find a way to evade the question or shift the focus," the document advises drivers.

When asked how many crashes the system has experienced (the script uses the term "accidents"), drivers are told to respond: "It's a very safe system, and I'm not sure. You'd have to reach out to the company." Riders should expect similarly vague responses if they wonder how many employees or drivers TBC has, or how much the tunnels cost to dig. (About $53 million in total).

The use of Tesla's advanced driver assistance system that is branded "Autopilot" is clearly a sore point at TBC. Clark County does not currently permit the use of the various driver assistance features anywhere within the Loop system, including automatic emergency braking or technologies that make the vehicle aware of obstacles and keep the vehicle in lane.

Officials even require mechanics to check the vehicles to ensure these are not activated.

"In addition to completing the actions under the initial inspection checklist, maintenance staff will verify that the automatic features of the vehicle, such as steering and braking/acceleration/deceleration assist (commonly known as Autopilot) are disabled for manual loop operation," the document reads. The following checks will be conducted on a daily basis by CWPM technicians, according to the Vehicle Maintenance plan viewed by TechCrunch.

If a passenger should ask whether the Loop's Tesla vehicles use Autopilot, drivers will give a response. However, this content was marked "Public Safety Related Confidential" in the documents TechCrunch received and was redacted, as were many other technical details.

TechCrunch's repeated requests to officials to explain this decision went unanswered.

He who shall not be named

The script also covers responses to questions about Musk himself: "This category of questions is extremely common and extremely sensitive. Public fascination with our founder is inevitable and may dominate the conversation. Be as brief as possible, and do your best to shut down such conversation. If passengers continue to force the topic, politely say, 'I'm sorry, but I really can't comment' and change the subject."

Nevertheless, the script provides a number of replies to common Musk questions. Ask what Musk is like and you should expect the answer: "He's awesome! Inspiring / motivating / etc."

Follow up with: "Do you like working for him?" and you'll get a response that could have come straight from North Korea: "Yup, he's a great leader! He motivates us to do great work."

Should a customer wonder how involved Musk is in the business, the driver will tell them: "He's the company founder, and has been very involved and supportive." Questions about Musk's erratic tweets will be brushed off: "Elon is a public figure. We're just here to provide an awesome transportation experience!"

One question, however, seems to hint that not everyone is happy working for Musk: "Is it true what I've read about him in the papers that he [is a mean boss / smokes pot / doesn't let employees take vacations / etc.]?" Your driver's rather equivocal response will be: "I haven't seen that article, but that hasn't been my experience."

On a side note: While the hundreds of pages of training documents and operational manuals that TechCrunch obtained detail strong policies against drug use and harassment at the Loop, the word "vacation" does not otherwise appear.

Tech that's allowed

Because Clark County currently forbids the use of automated driving features in the Loop, human drivers could be part of the system for some time. But the system is home to plenty of other advanced technologies, according to design and operational documents submitted to Clark County. Each of the 62 Teslas in the underground Loop has a unique RFID chip -- as used in contactless payment systems -- that pinpoints its location when it passes over one of 55 antennas installed in the roadway, stations and parking stalls.

Each vehicle also streams data to 24 hotspots through the system, sharing its speed, state of charge, the number of passengers in the car, and whether they are wearing seatbelts. Riders should be aware that every car is also constantly streaming real-time video from a camera inside the passenger cabin. All this data, along with video from 81 fixed cameras throughout the Loop, is fed to an Operations Control Center (OCC) located a few blocks away from the Convention Center. Video is recorded and stored for at least two weeks.

In the OCC, an operator is monitoring the camera feeds and other sensors for security threats or other problems -- such as a driver using their own cellphone or speeding. The OCC can communicate with any driver via a Bluetooth headset or an in-car iPad that displays messages, alerts and a map of the car's location in the tunnels. Vehicles have strict speed limits, ranging from 10 mph within stations to 40 mph on straight tunnel sections, and must maintain at least 6 seconds of separation from the car in front.

During testing this spring, the documents reveal that Clark County officials found some drivers were not following all the rules. "When asked about the speed limitations, several drivers replied with wrong straightaway and/or curved tunnel speeds. None provided at station, express lane, or ramp speeds," reads one document. "Drivers were not announcing to the passengers to buckle their seatbelts. When asked, [some were saying] that they are optional or not required."

Several drivers were also failing to maintain the 6-second safety margin with cars in front. TBC told Clark County that it would provide refresher training in those areas.

TBC, Clark County, and the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, which oversees the LVCC, did not reply to multiple requests for comment for this story.

The LVCVA recently signed a contract with Alphabet's spin-out urban advertising agency, Intersection Media, to sell naming rights to the Loop system, which it hopes will net it $4.5 million.

TBC is currently building two extensions to the Loop to serve nearby hotels and ultimately wants to build a transit system covering much of the Strip and downtown Las Vegas with more than 40 stations. That system would be financed by TBC and supported by ticket sales.

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