Guanzon concurs with Padilla on translated court orders

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Komunidad ng Pamilya, Pasyente, and Persons with Disabilities (P3PWD) Representative Rowena Guanzon (left) and Senator Robin Padilla. (Photo: Rowena Guanzon/Facebook; Robin Padilla/Facebook)
Komunidad ng Pamilya, Pasyente, and Persons with Disabilities (P3PWD) Representative Rowena Guanzon (left) and Senator Robin Padilla. (Photo: Rowena Guanzon/Facebook; Robin Padilla/Facebook)

Former Commission on Elections (COMELEC) commissioner and Komunidad ng Pamilya, Pasyente, and Persons with Disabilities (P3PWD) representative Rowena Guanzon agreed with Senator Robin Padilla’s idea to have Filipino translations of state documents.

“I agree with Sen. Robinhood, all laws and court orders must have Filipino translation,” she said on Monday (July 18).

Padilla said on the same day that it was “unfair” to use English in government documents.

Parang sa akin, unfair ‘yun. Parang hindi patas para dun sa mga kababayan natin na ‘di ko naman sinasabing hindi nakakaintindi ng English ano kundi masyado kasing ‘yung may kinalaman sa batas, ‘yung mga English niyan masyadong hindi mo talaga din maintindihan,” he said. “Kailangan na talagang magkaroon ng parehas na pagtrato sa salitang Pilipino at English.”

(For me, that’s unfair. It seems unfair to our countrymen that not that I’m saying that they don’t understand English but that law-related documents use English that is often hard to understand.)

He added, “Sa karanasan ko po, hindi nagagamit ‘yung Filipino, laging English lang. Katulad sa batas natin ‘pag lumalabas ang batas natin, English. ‘Pag sa korte, ‘pag nasentensyahan ang tao, English ang binabasa.

(From my experience, Filipino is not used much, it’s always been English. When our laws are enacted, it’s in English. In court, when somebody is sentenced, it is read in English.)

The ex-actor signalled his intention by saying that he would file a bill in the Senate to ensure government documents can be produced in English and Filipino.

He is also pushing for court rulings to be recited in the person’s preferred language, citing Section 7, Article 14 of the 1987 Philippine Constitution, which states that Filipino and English are the languages that must be used for communication and instruction.

Mark Ernest Famatigan is a news writer who focuses on Philippine politics. He is an advocate for press freedom and regularly follows developments in the Philippine economy. The views expressed are his own.

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