Hassan begins treble quest on Day 4 of Olympic athletics

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The fourth day of athletics at the Tokyo Olympics takes place on Monday. AFP Sport looks at five stand-out events:

Women's 5,000m - Final

Sifan Hassan will discover whether her ambitious bid for an unprecedented Olympic treble was the right choice, despite the searing heat and humidity at the Tokyo Games.

The 28-year-old Ethiopia-born Dutch runner faces a testing day, running in heats for the 1500m in the morning before again taking to the track in the evening for the 5,000m final.

The world 1500 and 10,000m champion from 2019, who will also race the latter in Tokyo, said: "For me it is crucial to follow my heart.

"Doing that is far more important than gold medals. That keeps me motivated and it keeps me enjoying this beautiful sport."

Women's 100m hurdles - Final

World record holder Kendra Harrison's quest for an elusive championship gold will continue as she safely advanced through the semi-finals of the short hurdles.

The 28-year-old American has been the pick of a powerful group of US hurdlers in recent years, clocking a world record of 12.20sec in 2016.

But Harrison has endured disappointment when it comes to translating her times into titles and is yet to win an Olympic or outdoor world crown.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn lies in wait, however. The Puerto Rican fired out a warning shot as she charged to an Olympic record of 12.26sec in her semi-final.

Men's long jump - Final

"If anyone can, JuVaughn can," Swedish pole vault world record holder Armand Duplantis said of his former Louisiana State University roommate's bid for an audacious double in the long jump and high jump.

JuVaughn Harrison, 22, has made a habit of successfully doubling in both events, notably at the US Olympic trials last month where he topped 2.33m in the high jump and sailed a lifetime best of 8.47m in the long jump.

That has made him the first US athlete to qualify for both events since the legendary Jim Thorpe in 1912.

But his bid for high jump glory on Sunday faltered as the American finished seventh.

A medal chance in the long jump, however, seems more realistic. The only man to go further this season is Miltiadis Tentoglou of Greece, the reigning European champion who went out to 8.60m in May.

Also expected to push for a podium placing is Cuba's Juan Miguel Echevarria.

Women's 400m hurdles - Semi-finals

Sydney McLaughlin is prepared for the latest instalment of her rivalry with 2016 Olympic champion Dalilah Muhammad at the Tokyo Games.

The two American team-mates have been involved in a series of epic 400m hurdles in recent years, with Muhammad setting a world record to beat McLaughlin at the 2019 world championships in Doha.

McLaughlin responded last month with a dazzling victory over Muhammad at the US Olympic trials, storming to victory in a world record of 51.90sec, making her the first woman in history to duck under 52 seconds.

It has set the stage for another mouthwatering duel between the two hurdlers in Tokyo.

Women's 200m - Semi-finals

Fresh from retaining her 100m crown, Jamaica's Elaine Thompson-Herah will look to safely negotiate the semis in her bid to make it a double-double and repeat her feat of the 2016 Rio Olympics

She finished third in both the 100m and 200m at the Jamaican Olympic trials in June, where Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce -- who she beat for gold in the 100m on Saturday-- won both races.

The 200m is likely to pose a stiffer challenge for Thompson-Herah, however, although world champion Dina Asher-Smith of Britain has withdrawn through injury.

Fraser-Pryce and Thompson-Herah could both be upstaged by rising American star Gabby Thomas, who became the second fastest woman in history over 200m when she clocked a world-leading 21.61sec at the US trials in Eugene in June.

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