This is how much it will cost to use your household appliances under the new energy price cap

·3 min read

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The cost of using a gas hob will rise by more than £100 a year. (Yahoo News UK)
The cost of using a gas hob will rise by more than £100 a year. (Yahoo News UK)

Ofgem’s latest price cap rise will send the cost of using household appliances spiralling.

The energy regulator confirmed an 80% rise in its price cap on Friday, sending the average household’s yearly energy bill from £1,971 to £3,549 from 1 October.

At the start of the year, the average bill was £1,277.

With the price cap expected to rise even higher come January - amid record increases in global gas prices - there have been widespread calls for the incoming prime minister, Liz Truss or Rishi Sunak, to implement new support packages to help households facing a desperate struggle this winter.

Watch: Energy price cap to rise more than 80% to £3,549 from October

It comes as several charities and think tanks warned spiralling energy costs will plunge many households into destitution and put children, disabled and older people at serious risk.

While the bulk of the new sky-high bills this winter will come from heating - according to the Resolution Foundation, 80% of annual gas usage comes in winter when people heat their homes - using household appliances will also become more expensive under the new price cap.

Yahoo News UK has analysed Uswitch data to estimate how much prices of commonly used household appliances are set to rise from October.

The running costs of three separate household appliances will increase by more than £100 a year. (Yahoo News UK)
The running costs of three separate household appliances will increase by more than £100 a year. (Yahoo News UK)

The results are stark, with three commonly-used appliances set to cost more than £100 extra a year under the new price cap. It means using...

  • electric showers, which on average are used for one hour and 27 minutes a week, will cost an extra £127.54 a year, from £159.43 under the previous price cap to £286.97

  • gas hobs, used for an average two hours and 31 minutes a week, will cost an extra £114.62 a year, from £143.28 to £257.90

  • electric hobs, used for an average two hours and 38 minutes a week, will cost an extra £101.08 a year, from £126.85 to £227.93

Other notable increases - also based on average use times - are the cost of making a cup of tea, with kettle use set to increase in cost by an extra £61.21 a year, from £76.51 to £137.72.

Fridge/freezers, meanwhile, will cost an additional £55.66 a year, from £69.57 to £125.23.

There is better news elswhere, though. Charging phones and laptops will only increase by 20p and £5.85 a year respectively.

Watch: Chancellor responds to energy price cap rise

Watching TV and using a washing machine are also only subject to relatively marginal increases: £8.50 and £12.95 a year respectively.

Though the overall cost of running appliances will hugely increase, there are plenty of measures households can take to ensure they are only using the energy they need.

Read more: The 80 areas where people will spend more than a fifth of take home pay on energy bills

For example, the Energy Saving Trust calculates households can save £55 a year just by remembering to turn appliances off standby mode. Almost all electrical appliances can be turned off at the plug without upsetting their programming.

Using washing machines on a 30C cycle can also save money, while regularly defrosting fridge/freezers will reduce the amount of energy they use.