9 things that you may have missed as the Queen lies in state

·Fashion and Shopping Writer, Yahoo Life UK
·3 min read
Members of the public pay their respects as they pass the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II as it Lies in State inside Westminster Hall. (Getty Images)
Members of the public pay their respects as they pass the Queen's coffin as she lies in state inside Westminster Hall. (Getty Images)

Since Queen Elizabeth II died on 8 September, the carefully laid-out plans of what happens after the death of a monarch – known in Her Majesty’s instance as ‘Operation London Bridge’ – have been put into place.

As such the public are somewhat unaccustomed to the Royal Family traditions and pageantry that come with a state funeral, and the elements and items that currently accompany the Queen as she lies in state ahead of the funeral service on Monday.

As tens of thousands of people queue to pay their respects to the former monarch, with some waiting up to 24 hours, here is a guide to what to look out for in Westminster Hall.

Nine things to look our for as the Queen lies in state

The coffin The Queen’s coffin was made over 30 years ago by the same firm that created the casket in which Prince Phillip is interred. The lead-lined coffin, which preserves the body above ground for longer, was created out of oak from the Sandringham Estate.

The Royal Standard The flag draped over the Queen’s coffin is known as the Royal Standard. It is broken into four quadrants representing the ancient Kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland. It is also the flag which flies at royal residences only when the monarch is present.

Imperial State Crown One of three crowns at the Queen’s coronation, the Imperial State Crown is also present at the state opening of parliament every year. Originally created for King George VI, it is set with 2,868 diamonds, 269 pearls, 17 sapphires, 11 emeralds and four rubies.

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign's orb and sceptre, lying in state on the catafalque as members of the public file past in Westminster Hall, at the Palace of Westminster, ahead of her funeral on Monday, on September 16, 2022 in London, England. Members of the public are able to pay respects to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for 23 hours a day until 06:30 on September 19, 2022.  Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on September 8, 2022, and is succeeded by her eldest son, King Charles III. (Photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
The Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign's orb and sceptre on the Queen's coffin. (Getty Images)

Floral wreath Also on the coffin was a white floral wreath which featured white roses, white dahlias and foliage, including pine from the gardens at Balmoral and pittosporum, lavender and rosemary from the gardens at Windsor.

The Orb and Sceptre The Crown Jewels’ orb and sceptre – both dating back to 1661 – are placed next to the crown. The orb is a gold sphere surmounted by a cross and the sceptre, a 3ft-long gold rod. Both are used during a coronation.

Wanamaker Cross One of Westminster Abbey's four processional crosses, the Wanamaker Cross stands at the head of the Queen's coffin. It is made from ivory and silver gilt, and adorned with a series of gold and sapphire panels.

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign's orb and sceptre, lying in state on the catafalque as members of the public file past in Westminster Hall, at the Palace of Westminster, ahead of her funeral on Monday, on September 16, 2022 in London, England. Members of the public are able to pay respects to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for 23 hours a day until 06:30 on September 19, 2022.  Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on September 8, 2022, and is succeeded by her eldest son, King Charles III. (Photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
The Wanamaker Cross stands at the head of the Queen's coffin. (Getty Images)

Catafalque After the coffin was carried by eight guardsmen – not the usual six, due to the weight of the lead lining – into Westminster Hall, it was lifted onto the catafalque, a raised platform. The catafalque is surrounded by four yellow candles.

Household Cavalry Mourners are able to queue 24 hours a day to pay their respects while three ceremonial units, the Gentlemen at Arms, the Royal Company of Archers and the Yeomen of the Guard stand guard in a 24-hour vigil, switching places every 20 minutes.

Yeomen of the Guard The bodyguard of the British monarch, the Yeomen of the Guard stand alongside the Household Cavalry. The oldest British military corps still in existence, it was created by King Henry VII in 1485 after the Battle of Bosworth Field.