Khok: ‘Bakuna’ jokes

Ober Khok
·2 min read

First off, getting a bakuna or vaccine is no joking matter. It can spell the difference between possibly getting infected with Covid-19 or its mutations without the bakuna, and getting protected with the bakuna or—as often reported in the news, should you catch the bug—the effect will not be severe.

Second, and last, it doesn’t mean we can’t lighten the fear some people have in getting the jab done.

My tiny store hopes a dose of laughter will help make the needle seem less nasty. Here are play of words that have a bakuna theme, in the “use in a sentence” style (C for Cebuano, T for Tagalog, and E for English):

Grandma (E): What is a vaccine?

Grandson: It is the scene at the back of a movie set.

Teacher (T): Torquato, gamitin ang “bakuna” sa pangungusap.

Torquato: Meron ka ba kuna na luma? Ibibigay ko sana sa sanggol kong pamangkin.

Use Sinovac in a sentence:

Doctor (T): Sino vac out sa bakuna ngayon?

How about bakuna in Cebuano?

Jessa: Wa na, baku na gyod akong lola kay wa gainom og calcium tabs sa bata pa.

AstraZeneca, please, in Tagalog.

Mama (to son acting out or asta): Naku, naku, anak kung mak-astra ka, parang zeneca!

Thank me at least for the effort. Do help lighten the hearts of those in fear. Now let’s eat.

LET’S EAT BAKUNA. Bak, for bacon, U for umami flavor like cheese and tomato sauce, N for noodles, and A for asparagus or alugbati or any green vegetable you want.

COOK IT. Cook macaroni, drain, set aside. In a large skillet, render five bacon strips till crispy. Crumble and set aside. In the same pan, add 1/4 stick of butter to cook cubed luncheon meat. Add tomato sauce, minced onion, black pepper and powdered garlic. Add macaroni, vegetables and cheese. Cook till bubbly.