Listen to the Gordon Murray T.50's V12 exhaust note

·2 min read



The Gordon Murray Automotive T.50, promised to be the greatest — and perhaps last — analog supercar, is still undergoing testing. When we last saw a T.50 prototype, its naturally aspirated, mid-engined V12 was rev-limited to low speeds. Now, GMA has released another video showing two test mules at slightly higher velocities, giving us a better idea of what kind of exhaust note we can expect.

The testing takes place at the Dunsfold, England, test track famous for its appearances on "Top Gear." Though the Cosworth-built 3.9-liter V12 is said to have a redline of 12,100 rpm, in these tests it's still limited to 5,000 rpm. Still, that's enough to give us an idea of what kind of aural assault the car will deliver.

As it turns out, at low rpm there's a lot of the baritone rumble that seems to be de rigueur in modern performance cars. At higher speeds, the engine provides a bit more of the high-pitched hum of the T.50's spiritual predecessor, Murray's McLaren F1, though overall the exhaust note is quite loud. There's definitely more of a primal roar than the F1's all-business precision engineering whir.

But while it may sound like other supercars, Murray has been adamant that the T.50 will remain the anti-supercar supercar. It will prioritize agility and handling over raw horsepower, with styling that's more subdued than modern look-at-me-mobiles.

As such, Murray says the T.50 will be about the size of a 718 Boxster and lighter than a Mazda MX-5 Miata. Though the output of 654 horsepower at 11,500 rpm and 344 pound-feet of torque at 9,000 rpm may not win armchair bragging rights, its power-to-weight ratio should better the Ferrari LaFerrari's.

Production of the 1+2 seater is slated to begin in 2022. A production run of only 100 units has been promised, so if you think you might want to drop the $3 million on the last pure naturally aspirated, internal combustion-only sports car by arguably the greatest living supercar engineer on Earth, you should act fast.

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