Pictured: ‘Hero’ boy, 14, who drowned in canal while ‘trying to save friend’

·Freelance Writer
·2 min read
Logan Folger died on Saturday after getting into difficulty in the waterway near Chesterfield, Derbyshire. (SWNS)
Logan Folger died on Saturday after getting into difficulty in the waterway near Chesterfield, Derbyshire. (SWNS)

A 14-year-old boy who died after getting trapped in a canal for 30 minutes has been described as a “hero” by his devastated mother.

Logan Folger got into difficulty in the waterway near Chesterfield, Derbyshire, on 18 August before being pulled out by firefighters.

The teenager was taken to hospital in a serious condition but died on Saturday, three days after he was admitted.

Logan’s mother, Stacey Bentley, 35, paid tribute to her “loveable rogue”, saying he had jumped into the canal near Mill Green in Staveley to save his friend.

Tributes for Logan Folger have been left by Chesterfield canal. (SWNS)
Tributes for Logan Folger have been left by Chesterfield canal. (SWNS)

She told The Sun: “It was of some comfort that he managed to save his friend who I don’t think could swim. He is a hero.

“But I wish he’d been selfish and too scared to go into the water himself because he would still be alive today.”

Ms Bentley added that her son would “do anything for anybody and had a heart of gold”.

Police said they do not believe there are any suspicious circumstances surrounding the death of Logan’, who emergency services had initially struggled to locate.

Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service said it was “devastating” to report another water fatality this summer.

One tribute was written by Logan Folger's older brother. (SWNS)
One tribute was written by Logan Folger's older brother. (SWNS)

Group manager Lee Williams added: “It’s yet another reminder of how dangerous open water can be due to hidden currents or debris, and the risk of cold-water shock.

“Please remember Float to Live, and if someone’s in trouble in the water call 999 and ask for the Fire Service.”

Float to Live’s advice for people struggling in water is to not thrash around and instead lean back while extending arms and legs.

While leaning back, it is recommended to gently move your limbs to help say afloat until you can control your breathing, before calling out for help or swimming to safety.

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