Manila eighth most traffic-congested city in the world

·Contributor
·2 min read
Heavy traffic is pictured along Marcos Highway, as motorists queue for a checkpoint on the first day of the Philippine capital's reimplementation of a stricter lockdown to curb coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections, in Marikina City, Metro Manila, Philippines, August 4, 2020. (Photo: REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez)
Heavy traffic is pictured along Marcos Highway, as motorists queue for a checkpoint on the first day of the Philippine capital's reimplementation of a stricter lockdown to curb coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections, in Marikina City, Metro Manila, Philippines, August 4, 2020. (Photo: REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez)

As industries open up and some schools begin to physically reopen, new research has found that Manila is the eighth among cities in the world with the worst traffic, according to a study conducted by a United Kingdom-based insurance technology website.

GoShorty found that Manila, along with Tel Aviv in Israel and Tokyo in Japan, has a 43% congestion level, and citizens in these cities lose 98 hours to traffic annually.

“With the rise in congestion, we at GoShorty, have looked at the TomTom Congestion Index to determine which cities have the busiest roads. We also looked at which countries have implemented the most anti-emissions policies to combat extra pollution caused by traffic levels,” GoShorty said.

Istanbul in Turkey topped the list with a 62% congestion level and loses 142 hours to traffic annually, followed by Bogota in Colombia which has a 55% congestion level and 126 hours lost.

Mumbai in India is the third on the list, with a 53% congestion level and 121 hours lost to traffic, followed by Bucharest in Romania, Bengaluru and New Delhi in India, and Lodz in Poland.

The Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA), expecting the heavy volume of cars on the road upon the opening of the classes, implemented a modified number coding scheme in Metro Manila, from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., and from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Data from the MMDA has found that the vehicle volume along EDSA rose from August 18, 2022’s 381,028 to 410,844 on September 1.

“In 2020 we saw a drop in congestion and traffic, due to the pandemic. However, in 2022 we’re seeing more people going places again, returning to a form of normal. As such, there has been a worldwide rise in congestion, despite the rising cost of fuel prices,” GoShorty said.

Marvin Joseph Ang is a news and creative writer who follows developments on politics, democracy, and popular culture. He advocates for a free press and national democracy. Follow him on Twitter at @marvs30ang for latest news and updates. The views expressed are his own.

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