Metro Manila to become 4°C hotter by 2050

·Contributor
·2 min read
 A girl jumps into the polluted waters of Manila bay while others swim to cool off from the intense heat within the slum area of the Baseco compound in Tondo, Metro Manila, Philippines April 11, 2018. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco
A girl jumps into the polluted waters of Manila bay while others swim to cool off from the intense heat within the slum area of the Baseco compound in Tondo, Metro Manila, Philippines April 11, 2018. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco

Although June is supposed to be the start of rainy months in the Philippines, most days still feel like summer, especially in Metro Manila, due to the heat brought about by climate change and global warming.

Scientific research has indicated that the Earth is now on track to faster warming unless drastic global action is put in place soon. People who live in hot climates like the Philippines are now experiencing these changes as the global warming situation worsens.

In a study by scientists from ETH Zurich, a Swiss research university, Metro Manila was found to be one of the few cities in 2050 that will experience climate conditions that are “not currently experienced by any existing major cities.”

Researchers believe that 22% of the world’s 500 major cities will exist in climate conditions that do not currently exist on the planet. Metro Manila is said to be one of these locations.

By 2050, Metro Manila is expected to become 4°C hotter on average during the summer, while also having 8% less rainfall per year.

However, the country’s capital isn’t alone in these changes. Other tropical cities in the Southern Hemisphere, which already exist in warm conditions, are also likely to experience considerable changes in rainfall and extreme climate changes.

Jakarta is expected to become 3°C hotter with 196 millimeters less rainfall, while Rangoon will become 6°C hotter with 162 millimeters less.

Moreover, temperate cities in East Asia is also likely to become drier by 2050. Hiroshima is expected to lose 268 millimeters in rainfall, Taipei will lose 178 millimeters, and Macau will lose 111 millimeters.

Earlier, the United Nations Secretary-General, in response to the latest findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), said that the world will soon be uninhabitable unless governments reassess their energy policies.

In its report written by hundreds of scientists and backed by 195 countries, the IPCC insisted that all countries must reduce their fossil fuel use substantially, extend access to electricity, improve energy efficiency and increase the use of alternative fuels, such as hydrogen.

Meanwhile, members of the Philippine scientific community have earlier called for the next administration to prioritize and take urgent action on the climate emergency.

The scientists highlighted immediate strategies based on the findings in the Philippine Climate Change Assessment Reports (PhilCCA). Strategies found could already be implemented to address specific issues in the country such as food security and farmers’ resilience; health and human security; forest ecosystem services; aquatic resources and the survival of coastal communities; and community resilience to climate and natural hazards.

Pola Rubio is a news writer and photojournalist covering Philippine politics and events. She regularly follows worldwide and local happenings. She advocates for animal welfare and press freedom. Follow her twitter @polarubyo for regular news and cat postings.

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