Millionaire forced to axe plans to chop down trees to save two-mile journey to stables

·2 min read
A millionaire has lost a battle to cut down protected trees at his beauty spot home - to save himself a two-mile drive to his stables. 

Supermarket chain owner Chris Kiley, 67, wanted to axe the woodland to make a track through the nature reserve around his home. 

Mr Kiley told planners the 98-metre track would link his home with a small-holding on his land where he keeps horses and stables. 

But council officers rejected the bid - saying their could be no reasonable justification after more than 150 objections. 

Pictured: supermarket chain owner Chris Kiley

WALES NEWS SERVICE
Chris Kiley wanted to axe woodland to make a track through a nature reserve to his nearby stables. (Chris Kiley/Wales News Service)

A millionaire supermarket owner has had plans to cut down protected trees to create a shortcut at his home rejected.

Chris Kiley - owner of supermarket chain CK Foodstore - wanted to chop down woodland and lay a road through the nature reserve surrounding his house so he could reach his stables more quickly.

However, more than 150 objections were filed and Swansea Council denied permission for the plans, which would have seen a 98-metre track link Kiley's home with a smallholding where he keeps horses.

Council officers said there could be no reasonable justification for the move following local backlash.

Kiley, 67, bought the £2.5m home with his now ex-wife Alice, 32, a former Miss Great Britain entrant who appeared on Masterchef in 2013.

Kiley's house overlooks the Gower Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (Wales News Service)
Kiley's house overlooks the Gower coast AONB. (Wales News Service)

The application statement said 12 ‘small to medium’ trees would be felled for the track – but Kiley had promised to replace them.

The application read: "Access tracks are common features in countryside locations such as this and the development is considered a modest addition which will have an acceptable impact on the wider Gower AONB [area of outstanding natural beauty]."

Kiley said he wanted the track to cut down the current two-mile car journey from his home to the stables.

A millionaire has lost a battle to cut down protected trees at his beauty spot home - to save himself a two-mile drive to his stables. 

Supermarket chain owner Chris Kiley, 67, wanted to axe the woodland to make a track through the nature reserve around his home. 

Mr Kiley told planners the 98-metre track would link his home with a small-holding on his land where he keeps horses and stables. 

But council officers rejected the bid - saying their could be no reasonable justification after more than 150 objections. 

Pictured here are the plans for the path

WALES NEWS SERVICE
Kiley's plans received more than 150 objections. (Wales News Service)

The house overlooks Caswell Bay on the Gower Peninsula, which was designated the UK’s first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

The status makes winning planning approval much harder.

Among the 154 objections received was one from Bishopston Community Council, which said the track was not needed as there was already a path running alongside it.

Millionaire Kiley wanted to create a short-cut from his house to his stables (Wales News Service)
Millionaire Kiley wanted to create a short-cut from his house to his stables (Wales News Service)

The group also branded the plans ‘environmentally unacceptable’ because of the damage to trees and wildlife.

Preservation group The Gower Society also objected saying the proposals had a "possible undesirable impact upon the AONB and the prominent coastal slope".

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Swansea Council rejected Kiley's bid saying the planned track had "excessive width" and would harm the rural character of the site.

It said that because of the existing path it could not grant permission because "no reasonable justification or need" had been shown.

Kiley intended to demolish the house to build a modern Grand Designs-style home in its ground.

He had argued the home would fit "seamlessly" into the character of the seafront.

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