Phones Made Smarter With Time

Mobile phones have become more than handy. They've come light years away from how Wikipedia traced its history as mobile phones charting the development of devices which connect wirelessly to the public switched telephone network.

From back to Reginald Fessenden's invention and shore-to-ship demonstration of radio telephony, through hand-held radio transceivers made available in the 1940s and later on mobile phones for autos. From a time when early devices were bulky and consumed high power and the network supported only a few simultaneous conversations. Modern cellular networks allowed automatic and pervasive use of mobile phones for voice and data communications.

In the U.S., engineers from Bell Labs began work on a system to allow mobile users to place and receive telephone calls from cars, leading to the inauguration of mobile service on June 17, 1946 in St. Louis, Missouri. Shortly after, AT&T offered Mobile Telephone Service. A wide range of mostly incompatible mobile telephone services offered limited coverage area with few available channels in urban areas.

The intro of cellular technology, which allowed re-use of frequencies many times in small adjacent areas covered by relatively low powered transmitters, made widespread adoption of mobile phones economically feasible. Cellular phones swept the world by storm. The first fully automated mobile phone system for vehicles was launched in Sweden in 1956. Named MTA (Mobile Telephone system A), it allowed calls to be made and received in the car using a rotary dial.

The car phone could also be paged. Calls from the car were direct dial, whereas incoming calls required an operator to determine which base station the phone was currently at. In 1962, an upgraded version called Mobile System B (MTB) was introduced. This was a push-button telephone, and used transistors and DTMF signalling to improve its operational reliability.

The first Analog cellular system widely deployed in North America was the Advanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS).[20] It was commercially introduced in the Americas in 1978, Israel in 1986, and Australia in 1987. AMPS was a pioneering technology that helped drive mass market usage of cellular technology, but it had several serious issues by modern standards. It was unencrypted and easily vulnerable to eavesdropping via a scanner; it was susceptible to cell phone ''cloning;'' and it used a Frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) scheme and required significant amounts of wireless spectrum to support. In the '90s, the 'second generation' (2G) mobile phone systems emerged.

Two systems competed for supremacy in the global market: the European developed GSM standard and the U.S. developed CDMA standard. These differed from the previous generation by using digital instead of Analog transmission, and also fast out-of-band phone-to-network signalling. The rise in mobile phone usage as a result of 2G was explosive and this era also saw the advent of prepaid mobile phones.

And the rest is STILL making history. Now we have 'Smartphones.' These are mobile phones that have become incredibly advanced, with multicore processors and cameras that take photos with amazing resolution that make some of us forget that we 'DO HAVE' point-and-shoot cameras.

Some examples of such Smartphone greats, are the iPhone5, the amazing Samsungs (Galaxy Note II and the S3) and the co-Android phones such as HTC and the like. Will tell yah next time what makes these gadgets special.

Lemme hear from yah!

techiemommy@gmail.com

Editor’s note:Yahoo Philippines encourages responsible comments that add dimension to the discussion. No bashing or hate speech, please. You can express your opinion without slamming others or making derogatory remarks.

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