Robin Padilla ‘learned’ how to judge characters in New Bilibid Prison

·Contributor
·2 min read
Senator-elect Robin Padilla addresses the attendees of the Asia's Golden Icons Awards at Okada Manila, Parañaque City, Philippines on June 28, 2022. (Photo: Mariel Rodriguez Padilla/Facebook)
Senator-elect Robin Padilla addresses the attendees of the Asia's Golden Icons Awards at Okada Manila, Parañaque City, Philippines on June 28, 2022. (Photo: Mariel Rodriguez Padilla/Facebook)

Actor and Senator-elect Robin Padilla is vying for a seat in the Commission on Appointments (CA).

How is he fit for the job? While attending an orientation for the newly elected senators last Tuesday (June 28), Padilla told the media that he learned how to judge one’s character while he was in New Bilibid Prison (NBP): when he was serving time for illegal possession of firearms.

Kung mag-a-apply ako, doon ko gusto. ‘Yan ang natutunan ko sa Bilibid: kumilatis ng tao. Tingin pa lang sa tao alam ko na (If I were to apply, I’d pick that one. That’s what I learned in Bilibid: to assess a person’s character. One look at a person, I’d already know),” he said.

Although he was meant to serve eight years, it was instead halved after he was conditionally pardoned by ex-Pres. Fidel V. Ramos. He would then be absolutely pardoned from outgoing Pres. Rodrigo Duterte last 2016.

The CA has authority to approve or disapprove the President of the Philippines’ appointments, and are expected to judge appointees’ qualifications and wellbeing impartially.

Padilla assured that he will remain impartial, even when it came to appointments made by President-elect Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, Jr. He believed that the son and namesake of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos, Sr. would understand that it would simply be his job in the CA.

Hindi naman po ako bastos. Sasabihin ko naman po kung bakit sa palagay ko hindi po nababagay sa kanya ang posisyon na ‘yun. Hindi naman po ako mang-iisnab o hindi dadating mga ganun. Diretso ko pong sasabihin,” Padilla, a Marcos ally himself, emphasized.

(“I’m not rude. I’ll explain why I feel that you aren’t fit for a certain position. I wouldn’t snob nor anything like that. I’ll be frank about it.”)

Just this May, Padilla also expressed interest in being the chairman for the Senate Committees for Constitutional Amendments and Revision of Codes, and National Defense and Security, Peace, Unification and Reconciliation.

According to the “Bad Boy” of Filipino movies, he wanted to take charge in the former as a means to push for Charter Change (Cha-Cha). On why he wanted the latter spot, Padilla simply said “[...] kasi kung member ka lang, sayang naman pagka-number one natin ([...] if I’d just be a member, then it’d be a waste to be number one in the first place).”

Although he topped the senate race with almost 26 million votes, Padilla was not safe from criticism, with netizens likening his platforms to ones made by sixth graders just this January.

Reuben Pio Martinez is a news writer who covers stories on various communities and scientific matters. He regularly tunes in to local happenings. The views expressed are his own.

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