Seamus the dog delights crowds as Irish Guards mascot during Platinum Jubilee parade

·Breaking News Editor, Yahoo News UK
·2 min read

The UK's armed forces turned out to help the nation celebrate the Platinum Jubilee on Thursday, but it was one canine companion who won the admiration of the masses.

Irish wolfhound Turlough Mor, also known as Seamus, took centre stage walking down The Mall to lead his troops to Horse Guards Parade for Trooping the Colour.

Seamus, The mascot Irish wolfhound dog of the Irish Guards, a regiment of the Household Division Foot Guards, walks with its handler during the Trooping the Colour ceremony at Horse Guards Parade. (PA)
Seamus, the wolfhound which is the regimental mascot of the Irish Guards, a regiment of the Household Division Foot Guards, walks with its handler during the Trooping the Colour. (PA)

The Irish Guards are the only Household Division regiment with a mascot, of which each one is presented by the Irish Kennel Club.

Seamus' handler, drummer Adam Walsh, previously said it was a "real privilege” to be part of Trooping the Colour.

“When it comes to the day, it’s all going to pay off. A lot of the lads have bigger parts to play than me and Seamus, but me and him still need to get it all correct,” he added.

(Sky News)
Seamus led out the Irish(Sky News)
Seamus, the Irish Wolfhound regimental mascot dog of the Irish Guards is seen during the Colonel's Review ahead of the Trooping of the Colour taking place next week, on Horseguards Parade in London, Britain May 28, 2022. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Seamus' handler, drummer Adam Walsh, who is Seamus’s handler, previously said it was a "real privilege” to be part of Trooping the Colour. (Reuters)

Walsh has had Seamus for just under two weeks and said that the Irish wolfhound celebrated his second birthday last week.

He said he has “never met a dog like Seamus” as “not much phases him at all”.

“He’s not nervous. I’m the one who’s nervous, so he’s going to be the one who keeps me on track.”

Seamus, the Irish Wolfhound regimental mascot dog of the Irish Guards is seen during the Colonel's Review ahead of the Trooping of the Colour taking place next week, on Horseguards Parade in London, Britain May 28, 2022. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Seamus recently turned two. (Reuters)

Trooping the Colour gets it name from a tradition dating back to the 1700s, in which different regiments would show off their flags, so troops would recognise their banners during battle.

Read more: Beaming Queen makes unexpected appearance to view Trooping the Colour

In 1748, King George II combined the annual summer military march with his birthday celebration, despite being born in October.

This tradition has lasted over the course of time, with the Queen taking part in birthday celebrations in June each year, which is known as Trooping the Colour and marks her official birthday, as well as on April 21 – the day she was actually born.

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