This is what sex will be like when you're pregnant, according to a gynecologist

Brianne Hogan
Wondering whether you can have sex during pregnancy? We took your questions to a gynecologist and you'll want to know what she said.

Khloé Kardashian got super real today about having sex during pregnancy, and we’re sure many mamas can relate. Revealing that her sex life with her boyfriend, Tristan Thompson, has been “interesting” since she’s been preggers, the reality TV star shared that “as I got into my third trimester and started to get bigger, it became harder to have sex and a little more uncomfortable and limiting.”

Her comments got us wondering about everything expecting moms should know about having sex during pregnancy. Because, as Kardashian pointed out, she’s probably not alone in feeling that her sex level isn’t the same as it was pre-pregnancy.

HelloGiggles reached out to Dr. Jennifer Wider, a women’s health expert, via email to answer all of our pressing questions.

HelloGiggles: Is it safe to have sex while pregnant?

Dr. Jennifer Wider: Yes, unless otherwise directed by a doctor. Many couples worry that having sex during pregnancy will injure the baby. But the amniotic sac and the strong uterine wall muscles provide very good protection of the growing fetus.

HG: Does sex during pregnancy really feel that different?

JW: Some women feel a heightened libido while pregnant, others complain that they are never in the mood. It really varies depending on the woman and the stage of pregnancy she is in.

For example, during the first trimester, some women don’t want their breasts to be touched because they are super sensitive. This feeling generally subsides in the next two trimesters. As the uterus grows, certain positions become more uncomfortable (e.g. missionary), so it’s important to speak honestly and openly to your partner about what is most comfortable for you.

HG: It might be awkward, but what’s good about having sex during pregnancy (besides the obvious)?

JW: One positive aspect of having sex while pregnant is that the contractions you experience during an orgasm can help strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, which you will want to be strong for labor and delivery.

HG: Can sex trigger labor?

JW: If you have sex closer to term, and if you have an orgasm, which releases prostaglandins, it can cause uterine contractions that could potentially trigger labor.

HG: What are the best sexual positions for pregnant women to try?

JW: Any position that makes them comfortable. Most women prefer being on top, especially as the pregnancy progresses.