News anchor suffers 'beginnings of a stroke' on live TV — what are the warning signs?

·Lifestyle Editor
·6 min read

This article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Contact a qualified medical professional before engaging in any physical activity, or making any changes to your diet, medication or lifestyle.

American reporter Julie Chin experienced stroke symptoms on live TV: The fast five

1. On Saturday morning, news anchor Julie Chin began to stumble over her words while reading a teleprompter on live television. She suffered the "beginnings of a stroke."

2. A stroke happens "when blood stops flowing to any part of your brain." This results in a sudden loss of brain function.

3. During a stroke, every minute counts. The acronym F.A.S.T. helps to determine key warning signs and symptoms to watch out for.

4. While strokes can happen to anyone at any age, those with high blood pressure and heart disease are more at risk. Other factors include smoking, excessive alcohol use, obesity and diabetes.

5. To prevent a stroke, keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control, quit smoking, eat a healthy diet and be physically active.

So, what's the scoop?

Oklahoma news anchor Julie Chin is recovering after suffering the "beginnings of a stroke" on live television.

On Saturday morning, the KJRH Tulsa weekend news anchor began to stumble over her words while reading a teleprompter about NASA's recently postponed mission to the moon.

After struggling to speak, Chin told viewers, "I’m sorry, something is going on with me this morning," before passing her segment to the station's meteorologist. The anchor's colleagues immediately called an ambulance after recognizing that something was wrong with her.

"I'm so glad to tell you I'm OK," Chin posted on Facebook a day after the event. "The past few days are still a little bit of a mystery, but my doctors believe I had the beginnings of a stroke live on the air Saturday morning. Some of you witnessed it firsthand, and I'm so sorry that happened."

The reporter further explained that she had no warning signs before the incident.

"The episode seemed to have come out of nowhere. I felt great before our show. However, over the course of several minutes during our newscast things started to happen," she added. "First, I lost partial vision in one eye. A little bit later my hand and arm went numb. Then, I knew I was in big trouble when my mouth would not speak the words that were right in front of me on the teleprompter."

After spending a few days in the hospital surrounded by medical professionals, Chin is on the mend.

"I’m glad to share that my tests have all come back great...There are still lots of questions, and lots to follow up on, but the bottom line is I should be just fine. Most importantly I’ve learned that it’s not always obvious when someone has a stroke, and action is critical...be fast and call 911," she urged.

In her Facebook post, Chin also shared the acronym B.E. F.A.S.T. which highlights common symptoms. This stands for Balance (loss of balance), Eyes (sudden vision changes), Face (facial droop), Arms (one arm usually drifts down), Speech (slurred or confused) and Time (call an ambulance as quickly as possible).

Stroke emergency awareness and recognition signs, medical procedure infographic
In her Facebook post, Chin shared the acronym B.E. F.A.S.T. to highlights common stroke symptoms. (Photo via Getty Images)

What is a stroke?

According to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, a stroke happens "when blood stops flowing to any part of your brain, damaging brain cells. The effects of a stroke depend on the part of the brain that was damaged and the amount of damage done."

Strokes result in a sudden loss of brain function. This can be caused by a blockage or clot in a blood vessel in your brain (ischemic), or when an artery in your brain bursts (hemorrhagic).

The Government of Canada revealed that strokes can happen at any age. Although they are more common for the elderly population, one quarter of Canadians who have had a stroke are under the age of 65.

Rear close up view aged grey-haired mother cuddles her grown up daughter. Teen granddaughter strong embrace loving grandma feeling empathy worried about older relative woman health, share mental pain
Strokes can happen to anyone at any age. One quarter of Canadians who have had a stroke are under the age of 65. (Photo via Getty Images)

What are the major symptoms of a stroke?

During a stroke, every minute counts. Getting treatment as soon as possible can lessen the brain damage that a stroke can cause. By knowing the signs and symptoms, you can take quick action and perhaps save a life.

Similar to Chin's message, to detect signs and symptoms of a stroke, the Heart and Stroke Foundation advises people to remember the acronym F.A.S.T:

F- Facial drooping or numbness. This can be detected by asking the affected person to smile and looking for any unevenness.

A- Arm weakness or numbness. Someone suffering a stroke may feel a general sense of weakness or numbness in the arms. Ask the person to raise both of their arms. If they are unable to do so, this could be a warning sign of a stroke.

S- Slurred speech. During a stroke, a person may slur their speech or find it difficult to speak. Words can sound like gibberish or speech may be slowed or delayed. Even if their speech returns to normal, call for medical assistance immediately.

T- Time to call 911. Call an ambulance immediately if a person experiences any of these stroke symptoms.

woman prevent stroke by lifting weights
To help prevent a stroke, eat a healthy diet and be physically active. (Photo via Getty Images)

Who is at risk of a stroke?

While they can occur to anyone, there are several factors that can increase a person's risk for having a stroke. If you suffer from high blood pressure or heart disease, you are more at risk, as well as those with a history of transient ischemic attacks.

Other risk factors include smoking, excessive alcohol use, obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, having an abnormal heart rhythm, living a sedentary lifestyle and consuming a diet low in fruits and vegetables.

How can I prevent a stroke?

While strokes can be unpredictable, it is possible to reduce the risk of having one.

The Government of Canada recommends keeping your blood pressure and cholesterol under control, quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet and being physically active.

Additionally, if you are more at risk, consult a healthcare professional who can work with you to treat or prevent the medical conditions or lifestyle choices that can lead to a stroke.

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