There's money in pig's manure

Who would've thought there's money in pig's manure?

Well, the World Bank is set to teach Filipino hog raisers that pig's manure is not well, waste.

The Washington-based lender on Monday announced a financial incentive scheme for piggeries in the Philippines to invest in wastewater treatment facilities and effectively collect methane, a gas used for electricity generation.

The project will allow piggeries to earn one "carbon credit" per ton of methane captured, the World Bank said in a statement.

Carbon credits may then be traded for access from the Spanish Carbon Fund administered by the World Bank, giving farmers an additional revenue stream.

The project is expected to encourage piggeries to "install proper waste management management systems and reduce the emission of methane, a potent greenhouse gas," the World Bank said.

"This is the first program of activities (POA) from the Philippines to be registered and it is the first registered biogas POA in the animal waste sector in Southeast Asia, a region home to a significant number of the world’s pigs," World Bank's carbon finance specialist Nick Bowden said in the statement.

The project will be implemented through a partnership with the Landbank of the Philippines, which will provide financing for interested pig owners who wish to install methane-capturing wastewater treatment systems, the World Bank said.

"We are pleased to work with the World Bank on this project because we are hitting two goals at the same time: providing financial support to farmers in the countryside - which is our core mandate - while contributing to efforts at mitigating climate change," the World Bank quoted Landbank President and Chief Executive Gilda Pico.

Full implementation of the program is expected to produce over 100,000 tons of carbon credits per year from dozens of pig farms across the country.

"This is the equivalent to a reduction of 100,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere," the World Bank said.

For his part, World Bank Country Director Motoo Konishi said the program will contribute to the global efforts to address climate change.

"Climate change poses a serious threat to development especially to the ability of the poor to move out of poverty. That’s why initiatives like these are very important," Konishi said.

Editor’s note:Yahoo Philippines encourages responsible comments that add dimension to the discussion. No bashing or hate speech, please. You can express your opinion without slamming others or making derogatory remarks.

  • Chronicling the komedya in Antique VERA Files - The Inbox
    Chronicling the komedya in Antique

    By Alex C. Delos Santos, VERA Files The first time Cecile Locsin-Nava, a scholar on cultural studies in Western Visayas, came to Antique around ten years ago was to gather data for a research on the korido, or Philippine narrative … Continue reading → …

  • Ayungin dilemma Ramon Casiple - Parallaxis
    Ayungin dilemma

    China faces a dilemma in Ayungin Shoal and other contested areas. If it waits for the ITLOS—which may decide against it—it would have tacitly bound itself to UNCLOS and risk a rogue state reputation if it asserts its claim in the South China Sea. If its militarily acts now, it may face international isolation. …

  • 48 nabbed in biggest anti-trafficking catch in Bongao VERA Files - The Inbox
    48 nabbed in biggest anti-trafficking catch in Bongao

    By Jake Soriano, VERA Files Bongao, Tawi-tawi—A team of Marines and policemen intercepted around noon Thursday 48 people, 12 of them minors, believed recruited by a human trafficking syndicate for work in Malaysia. The arrest constitutes what advocates called the … Continue reading → …

POLL
Loading...
Poll Choice Options