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  • Philippines' oldest artworks in danger of disappearing
    Philippines' oldest artworks in danger of disappearing

    The 127 engravings of people, animals and geometric shapes are the Southeast Asian nation's oldest known artworks, but encroaching urbanisation, vandals and the ravages of nature are growing threats. The artworks have been declared a national treasure, regarded as the best proof that relatively sophisticated societies existed in the Philippines in the Stone Age. "They show that in ancient times, the Philippines did have a complex culture. Museum scientists believe the carvings date back to …

  • Hong Kong, Philippines end emotional hostage row
    Hong Kong, Philippines end emotional hostage row

    Hong Kong and the Philippines announced Wednesday they had resolved an enduring and deeply emotional row over a deadly hostage crisis, allowing soured diplomatic relations to return to normal. The breakthrough came after a deal was struck on the most sensitive issues of compensation to the victims of the tragedy, which saw eight tourists from Hong Kong killed following a bus hijacking in Manila in 2010, as well as an apology. "The resolution of the incident enables the normalisation of the …

  • Philippines arrests extremist in Malaysia resort kidnapping
    Philippines arrests extremist in Malaysia resort kidnapping

    Philippine forces on Wednesday arrested a Muslim extremist believed to have taken part in the kidnapping of 21 people from a Malaysian resort in 2000, a senior commander said. Such cross-border kidnappings have become more common recently with militants from the lawless southern Philippines travelling to nearby Malaysia, where there are many dive resorts popular with foreign tourists. Nabil Talahi Idjiran, a member of the Abu Sayyaf group who took part in one such raid on Malaysia's Sipadan …

  • Venezuela's Maduro promises importers overdue hard currency
    Venezuela's Maduro promises importers overdue hard currency

    Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro promised to pay back billions of dollars in government debt to disgruntled importers, after widespread shortages of basic goods helped fuel months of deadly anti-government protests. "We are going to immediately pay back 30 percent of (the total hard currency owed to importers) as a way to move forward on these commitments," Maduro told a gathering of business leaders. Venezuela -- which sits atop the world's largest proven crude oil reserves -- has Latin …

  • China to open 8 state industries for investment

    BEIJING (AP) — China's government says it will open 80 projects in eight state-run industries to private and foreign investors as part of efforts to make its slowing economy more efficient. …

  • UN considering sanctions over South Sudan massacre
    UN considering sanctions over South Sudan massacre

    NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The U.N. Security Council on Wednesday viewed "horrific pictures of corpses" from the scene of last week's massacre in South Sudan and discussed taking actions that could include sanctions, diplomats said. …

  • Things you need to know this morning, April 24
    Things you need to know this morning, April 24

    To keep you updated with the latest news here and abroad, Yahoo Philippines is giving you a roundup of morning headlines. …

  • Pentagon dossier to detail secretive U.S. Afghan detainee policy

    Some are suspected fighters from Yemen, Russia or Pakistan, arrested by U.S. forces in Afghanistan or elsewhere. Several have been linked to al Qaeda. As the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan winds down, the White House will soon provide Congress a dossier on about 50 non-Afghan detainees in a U.S. military prison north of Kabul. Their uncertain fate presents sensitive security and legal problems for the Obama administration in an echo of Guantanamo Bay. …

  • Body of Korean boy who raised alarm on sinking ferry believed found
    Body of Korean boy who raised alarm on sinking ferry believed found

    By Miyoung Kim SEOUL (Reuters) - The body of a South Korean boy whose shaking voice first raised the alarm that a passenger ferry with hundreds on board was in trouble has been found, his parents believe, but a DNA test has yet to confirm the find, media said on Thursday. His parents had checked his body and clothes and concluded he was their son, the Yonhap news agency said. Captain Lee Joon-seok, 69, and other crew members who abandoned ship have been arrested on negligence charges. …

  • Initiative seeks to legalize pot in Nevada
    Initiative seeks to legalize pot in Nevada

    A pro-marijuana group hoping to ride a wave of mounting acceptance for cannabis filed an initiative petition Wednesday seeking to legalize recreational pot use in Nevada. The measure backed by a group ... …