VIEW: Personal touch missing in Philippine education

Manila (Philippine Daily Inquirer/ANN) - Fifty-three. That's the average number of secondary school students in a class in the Philippines; some classes go as high as 80. Almost none (in public schools) go below 30. Yet 30 is about the max a teacher can handle; even that is high, 25 would be ideal.

You don't teach to 53, you lecture. There cannot be, is not, any individual attention. The child's unique abilities or lack of them can't be addressed by the teacher. Individual homework can't be discussed, let alone read with any degree of depth.

In a large class you learn by rote, you learn just what is taught you; you can't question, you can't ask for further explanation. It's hard to develop independent thinking and initiative.

In other news: Philippines among Asian nations worst hit by disasters in 2012

Fortunately, private schools do limit the numbers, and the difference is stark. Initiative, independent thinking flourish and the result shows up in the top level talent that is available. But it's the minority. Those from the majority take low-paying, menial jobs where with a more personalised education they could have done better.

And until President Benigno Aquino III came to power they weren't given enough time to think at all. A 10-year school system kicks you out on the streets at 15. Much too young to face the big, bad world.

The 12 years now introduced leaves only Djibouti and Angola on the outskirts. But that 12-year scheme, desirable as it certainly is, gives a worrying transition adjustment: What do colleges do with no freshmen for two years? Former education undersecretary and Star columnist Isagani Cruz wrote that among the K to 12 Committee's plans is for the Departement of Education "to lease the facilities of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) for Senior High School classes." He added that it's "a good solution for HEIs, because they will still have income even if there are no freshmen or sophomore students."

Also read: SPECIAL REPORT: As returns on Philippine markets rise, so do risks

So you're out on the streets at 17, what do you do? The education you receive is still insufficient to meet the demand of the service sector. Agriculture doesn't pay, particularly on the legally restricted five hectares you're allowed. And manufacturing, where the jobs could be, is in Vietnam (heaven knows why). So government concentration must be on getting it back. And that may begin to happen as the attractiveness of elsewhere starts to fade.

Chinese costs are rising and its antagonism to Japan (and elsewhere) will give companies second thoughts. Vietnam is starting to unravel (foreign executives say it's a nightmare doing business there, according to The Economist. Thailand is a growingly uncertain place, Myanmar isn't ready yet (but soon could be), and so on. So putting the Philippines back into manufacturing must be a primary policy of President Aquino. More aggressively so than it is today.

But today I want to tell you a little story, one I'd like to see replicated.

I'll bet you've never been to Sapang Palay. I'll bet you've never heard of Sapang Palay. Well, don't be too embarrassed, I hadn't either and I've been here a long time, and to many, many places. It is located in San Jose del Monte in Bulacan and was used as a squatter relocation centre in the '60s.

Related story: SPECIAL REPORT: Bullish economy reminiscent of pre-1997 crisis

But I was invited to a 60th birthday party of a friend, a good friend so I of course had to go. This friend had built an orphanage and school for the poor. Forty orphans, and 100 pupils from poor families with little chance of a future. He's building that future for them.

And who is he? You won't believe, but an Irish priest from the parish of Sittingbourne, Kent, in the UK. My daughter stayed with him for many months while she was studying there. But we'd become friends much earlier. He'd come here some years back and been dismayed by the poverty and deprivation of the poor children brought to him for blessing.

He decided to do something about it. He, together with a Filipino priest, Fr. Roger Cruz, founded Casa Famiglia in 1999 to care for abandoned, orphaned or abused children. He built a small dormitory (he came from a relatively well-to-do family) and took in orphans. They were unschooled, and there was no school. So he built one, and staffed it.

Also read: Philippines faces bright economic prospects for 2013

Over the years it has grown into a small community with a five-storey school, two dormitories (boys and girls), a place for that strange ball game Filipinos and Americans play. A game they seem remarkably clumsy at too, they don't seem to be able to hold onto the ball, they keep dropping it.

He is teaching the curriculum, but he is doing more, he is teaching skills. And this is where I think much of the public education must head. Practical reality says that the hopelessly overcrowded Philippine school system and hopelessly inadequate business system must come together.

Sadly, there's no longer the luxury of the time to teach a well-rounded, full education. Education must be geared to the following life. And that's what Jim has done. His school has an extended kitchen to teach basic culinary skills. There's a room with a bed, tables and chairs and cabinets. A homemakers room, where housekeeping skills are taught.

I've promised him a workshop equipped to teach carpentry, plumbing, electricity, metalworking to give young people a trade. To give poor kids a future. I'm in the market for anyone who'd like to help.

This is a story that can be replicated, that must be replicated I think if the "inclusive growth" the president wants is to be achieved. If the personal attention children must have is to be achieved.

COPYRIGHT: ASIA NEWS NETWORK

Loading...

Editor’s note:Yahoo Philippines encourages responsible comments that add dimension to the discussion. No bashing or hate speech, please. You can express your opinion without slamming others or making derogatory remarks.

  • Philippines backs support for small enterprises at APEC meet

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippines' top trade official on Saturday called for support for the integration of micro, small and medium enterprises in global trade, which he said would help reduce poverty and inequality in the Asia-Pacific region. …

  • US renews travel warning to Mindanao
    US renews travel warning to Mindanao

    The US State Department renewed its warning about the risks of travel to the Philippines, in particular to the Sulu archipelago, certain regions and cities of Mindanao and the southern Sulu Sea area. In an update on Wednesday of a travel warning it issued Nov. 20, 2014, the State Department said US citizens should continue to defer non-essential travel to the Sulu archipelago due to the high threat of kidnapping of international travelers and violence linked to insurgency and terrorism there. …

  • Phl gains support for APEC Action Agenda
    Phl gains support for APEC Action Agenda

    The Philippine initiative to put the interests of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) front and center in global and regional trade has made significant progress following the conclusion on Thursday of the 2nd APEC Senior Officials’ Meeting (SOM2) and Related Meetings in Boracay, Aklan. Called “The Boracay Action Agenda to Globalize MSMEs,” the Philippine proposal calls for a host of specific, concrete and practical interventions that APEC economies can implement to provide MSMEs wider …

  • Phl to join Bangkok meet on Rohingya crisis next week
    Phl to join Bangkok meet on Rohingya crisis next week

    The Philippines will join a 15-nation meeting in Bangkok, Thailand next week to address the migration crisis involving thousands of Rohingyas who escaped persecution in Myanmar and Bangladesh. Justice Secretary Leila de Lima bared this yesterday after meeting with United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) representative to the Philippines Bernard Kerblat. In an interview, De Lima said the Philippine government has been invited to the meeting. …

  • Magnitude 4.2 quake jolts Sorsogon
    Magnitude 4.2 quake jolts Sorsogon

    LEGAZPI CITY—A magnitude 4.2 earthquake hit Prieto Diaz town in Sorsogon before dawn yesterday, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) said. …

  • Drought-resistant rice breeds bared
    Drought-resistant rice breeds bared

    SCIENCE CITY OF MUÑOZ, Nueva Ecija – Amid the searing heat, the Philippine Rice Research Institute central experiment station here has identified nine rice breeds which have been proven to be drought-resistant and produce high yields in temperatures as high as 38°C based on a recent study. Thelma Padolina, lead researcher of the study titled “Screening of rice-induced mutants for heat and drought tolerance,” identified the breeding lines as the Ballatinaw lines, PSB Rc72H and Azucena lines. …

  • Phl, US assert rights, ignore China warning
    Phl, US assert rights, ignore China warning

    The United States military will continue air and sea patrols in international waters even after the Chinese navy repeatedly warned a US surveillance plane to leave the airspace over artificial islands China is creating in the disputed South China Sea. The Philippine government also declared it would continue activities in the region, calling on China to respect freedom of navigation and aviation. “Our position on the importance of letting freedom of navigation, freedom of aviation and …

  • MM shutdown eyed for quake drill; 6 schools warned
    MM shutdown eyed for quake drill; 6 schools warned

    Electricity and mobile phone services would be cut throughout Metro Manila, and all private and government offices and businesses, including shopping malls, would be closed. That would be the situation on July 16 between 3 and 8 p.m. to simulate the scenario of a 7.2 magnitude earthquake. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) has warned that an earthquake of that magnitude could occur and kill at least 33,500 people and injure at least 113,600 others following a …

POLL

Should Aquino be held accountable over the Mamasapano operations?

Loading...
Poll Choice Options