Wildlife Around Singapore: Tigers enjoy Chinese New Year treats and other sightings

·2 min read
(PHOTO: YouTube screenshot; Allen Meek)
(Image credits: AFP video screenshot, Allen Meek)

Singapore's urban and green environment is home to a rich abundance of beautiful wildlife that we don't often see. In our Wildlife Around Singapore series, we share interesting flora and fauna that have been sighted around the island.

Tiger treats

We've just crossed into the Year of the Tiger in the Chinese zodiac, so of course, we've got to celebrate the new year by giving our actual tigers a good treat.

As part of festivities ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday, the Malayan tigers at Singapore Zoo enjoyed treats of fresh meat and bones delivered in auspicious red packages.

Panda cub debuts to public

Le Le, the first giant panda cub born in Singapore, made its public debut on 30 December after months of care by its mother and zoo staff.

Le Le weighed merely 200g at birth, but has grown to a weight of nearly 10kg.

Visitors to River Wonders can get up close to Le Le at a special enclosure at the Giant Panda Forest exhibit.

There are daily viewing sessions at 10.30am and 3.30pm, with each session lasting around 20 to 30 minutes.

Eagle goes fishing

Pomfret's a popular fish among humans – prices of the fish shot up recently ahead of Chinese New Year, with prices ranging from $50 to $100 per kg.

Pomfret's also a delicacy for birds – here's a white-bellied sea eagle at Pasir Ris Park with its catch. Don't you wish you could catch your own pomfret too instead of paying through your nose?

A white-bellied sea eagle with its catch of pomfret fish at Pasir Ris Park in Singapore on 25 December 2021. (Screenshot from video by Huesten Loh)
A white-bellied sea eagle with its catch of pomfret fish at Pasir Ris Park in Singapore on 25 December 2021. (Screenshot from video by Huesten Loh)

Bat feasts on fruit

This nocturnal photo of a lesser short-nosed fruit bat eating a fruit was shared in the Singapore Wildlife Sightings Facebook group.

A lesser short-nosed fruit bat in Singapore eating a fruit. (Photo: Allen Meek)
A lesser short-nosed fruit bat in Singapore eating a fruit. (Photo: Allen Meek)

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